Wicked Runs the Wolpertinger

You're putting up your armor when you leave, you leave because you're certain of who you want to be. ~Icarus. Bastille. All This Bad Blood.

fullten:

yupthatsmysock:

whitepeoplestealingculture:

This post was inspired by this picture:

This picture is reblogged always by the white people appropriating cultures and not caring when they are called out upon it. These people care more about the animals than the human beings they profit off of, and I thought that was hilarious so I had to make a set just like the picture above.

All in all, this is a message to the honkies: stay in your lane.

Wait. Yoga, though????

The luaus, the headdresses, the Ta moko, the dreads, etc— yes, I totally see where you’re coming from. The yoga one, though, seems a little weird to me. I know there’s probably greater meaning to yoga beyond it being a strenuous, disciplined workout and exercise in meditation, but I don’t see how it’s harmful to adopt a new type of exercise that’s better suited for your body???

My doctor told me to take up yoga as an alternative to high-stress/adrenaline exercises because it would strengthen my body without destroying it— but I can’t because I’m stealing culture? Someone please explain this to me.

I think the issue with yoga is that it’s repacked and striped of it’s roots for the consumption of people who really don’t understand the history or roots of yoga, they take out all the ‘boring’ history and religion, and leave a few words like ‘Namaste’ to feel spiritual, but they never actually talk about Buddhism or Hinduism. There is also something disturbing about the fact that when a western person thinks about yoga they don’t picture an Indian person practicing their religion, but a white lady with blonde hair in spandex. 

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

a couple of other quotes from the article i really like:

According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace

and

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

(via mercy-misrule)

I’ve reblogged this before but it will never stop speaking to my soul.

(via whineandbeer)

Fooling exploited people into thinking everything is just the way it should be is one of the most disturbing things about capitalism.

(via latinagabi)

Reblogging this so hard rn.

(via useyourwordsasher)

Reblogging again!  and again

and again

(via professionaltrans)

“When I shed my skin
for you, I left intact
my animal heart

the desire to crack bones between delicate teeth.”

Jeannine Hall Gailey, “The Animal Heart: She Warns Him,” from She Returns to the Floating World (via lifeinpoetry)

chutzpadik:

if ur disability activism doesn’t include addicts and people who don’t take their meds and people who will never be able to be Productive Members of Society????

it’s useless tbh


“Does it hurt?” asked the Rabbit.
“Sometimes,” said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. “When you are Real you don’t mind being hurt.”
“Does it happen all at once, like being wound up,” he asked, “or bit by bit?”
“It doesn’t happen all at once,” said the Skin Horse. “You become. It takes a long time. That’s why it doesn’t happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.”
- The Velveteen Rabbit (or How Toys Become Real) by Margery Williams, 1922

“Does it hurt?” asked the Rabbit.

“Sometimes,” said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. “When you are Real you don’t mind being hurt.”

“Does it happen all at once, like being wound up,” he asked, “or bit by bit?”

“It doesn’t happen all at once,” said the Skin Horse. “You become. It takes a long time. That’s why it doesn’t happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.”

The Velveteen Rabbit (or How Toys Become Real) by Margery Williams, 1922